13 Days of Figma - Visual examples of User Centered Design based
13 Days of Figma.

Day 13 - The Weird Words and Phrases Designers Use to Test Their Fonts

Figma Prototype: Day 13 - The Weird Words and Phrases Designers Use to Test Their Fonts

Day 13 Readability metrics are based primarily on word, sentence and paragraph lengths but don’t reflect how well readers actually understand the text. Content influences readability too so if the message is clear and the text is readable using the above elements in harmony, in theory, the composition is deemed a success. ~ Terry

Inspired by Issue 52 - Weird Words; Typeset




Day 12 - How to Measure Learnability of a User Interface

Figma Prototype: Day 12 - How to Measure Learnability of a User Interface

Day 13 The learnability of a product tells us how fast users reach optimal behavior with that product. It is important to measure learnability for UIs that get used relatively frequently. A learnability study involves repeated measurements of the same participants completing the same task. The result of a learnability study is a learning curve that will uncover how many repetitions are needed in order for users to complete the task efficiently.

Even if you don’t conduct a complete learnability research project to plot the full learning curve, thinking about these concepts will help you make the trade-off decisions to design products that target your most important customers. ~ NNg Group

Inspired by Issue 138 - How to Measure Learnability of a User Interface




Day 11 - The good, the bad and the ugly of A/B Testing

Figma Prototype: Day 11 - The good, the bad and the ugly of A/B Testing

Day 13 A catch-all term for most user testing methods. A/B testing does have its own advantages, however, and provides a great supplement to qualitative studies. Simply, you don’t know why you get the measured results as your not directly observing the users or gaining insights to their thoughts.

Quantitative research can help capture real-time activities in the workplace and point toward what needs attention.

Qualitative Research is about capturing people’s changing opinions and emotions at the touchy-feely end of the spectrum therefore the basis of empathic understanding how people perceive and do things. Qualitative research can be concentrated and more targeted to gather meaningful data. This method of research are not bound by the limitations of quantitative ‘bean-counting’ methods.

Inspired by Issue 211 - The good, the bad and the ugly of A/B Testing




Day 10 - Brutalist Design is the bad influence we all need

Figma Prototype: Day 10 - Brutalist Design is the bad influence we all need

Day 13 Law of Prägnanz research confirms that people are better able to visually process and remember simple figures than complex figures. The human eye likes to find simplicity and order in complex shapes because it prevents us from becoming overwhelmed with information.

Inspired by Issue 100 - Brutalist Design is the bad influence we all need




Day 9 - How to Write any Error Message

Figma Prototype: Day 9 - How to Write any Error Message

Day 9 Joined by some physical connection, law of element connectedness comes into play here. Design can exploit the grouping laws, such as element connectedness, to influence our perception of physical or graphical objects. This is particularly important when presenting users with large numbers of items at once.

Inspired by Issue 118 - Content design: How to write any error message




Day 8 - Designing for Human Memory

Figma Prototype: Day 8 - Designing for Human Memory

Day 8 The average person can only keep 7 (plus or minus 2) items in their working memory. The net promotor score card is a good example of Miller’s Law in practise.

Inspired by Issue 76 - Designing for Human Memory




Day 7 - How the Web Became Unreadable

Figma Prototype: Day 7 - How the Web Became Unreadable

Day 7 Similarity is an essential user interface design feature as this can encourage prompt detection of functional items ensuring that links and navigation elements are visually differentiated from text element, and are consistently styled. ~ Terry

Inspired by Issue 25 - How the Web Became Unreadable




Day 6 - Psychology of Simple

Figma Prototype: Day 6 - Psychology of Simple

Day 6 It is my role to understand and care about different user needs including those with visual, speech, auditory, physical or cognitive disabilities. Usability is about designing products to be efficient and satisfying usable by everyone regardless of age, ability and circumstance. Empathy towards the user is also a key principle. Interaction design is driven by a human connection and users are vital to the design process. ~ Terry

Inspired by Issue 4 - Psychology of Simple




Day 5 - Said no user ever

Figma Prototype: Day 5 - Said no user ever

Day 5 Empathic design is a consideration of how the end-user will use what is being designed. Exposing a project to empathy design early on in UX gains valuable feeback potentially saving hours of development time. UX is an approach to design and development that focuses on the context of use for the solution designed and having empathy of the end-users of a product, service, or system in order to improve the quality of the final solution. Empathy design has proven essential in my experience. ~ Terry

Inspired by Issue 115 - Said no user ever




Day 4 - What You Need to Know About Gestalt Principle #1

Figma Prototype: Day 4 - What You Need to Know About Gestalt Principle #1

Day 4 Placing all items in close proximity when searching for a specific item within a user interface does not aid detection speed. ~ Terry

Inspired by Issue 215 - What You Need to Know About Gestalt Principle




Day 3 - Hick’s Law — The law that makes or breaks a UX designer

Figma Prototype: Day 3 - Hick’s Law — The law that makes or breaks a UX designer

Day 3 If you can not reduce the choice, at least hide less popular options. It’s not just about the number of choices but about how distinct those choices are from one another. Hicks Law shows us that the more choices we offer a user, the longer it will take for them to decide, so increasing the chance they abandon the process. ~ Terry

Inspired by Issue 208 - Hick’s Law — Do you know the law that makes or breaks a UX designer?




Day 2 - Design Principles for Reducing Cognitive Load

Figma Prototype: Day 2 - Design Principles for Reducing Cognitive Load

Day 2 Research suggests our short-term memory stores are generally limited to around five items; visual working memory, responsible for encoding and storing visual information whilst we carry out other tasks, is thought to be limited to just four distinct items.

Inspired by Issue 3 - Design Principles for Reducing Cognitive Load




Figma Prototype: Day 1 - Why Users Aren’t Clicking Your Home Page Carousel

Day 1 UX affordance cues benefit from a carousel here given it’s natural timeline flow. ~ Terry

Inspired by Issue 32 - Why Users Aren’t Clicking Your Home Page Carousel